Saturday, 28 July 2007

Another Soup



My mom makes something similar to the recipe that follows and as a kid, I almost never had the soup…any soup. Now I realise what I have been missing out on!
This soup only gets made when I do a Tesco run as I use ‘Dudhi’ (gourd) as the main ingredient. I know, that’s sounds scary to some but in a soup, it’s fresh and light. Try it…

Ingredients
One medium Dudhi, chopped
One medium Potato, chopped
One small Carrot, chopped
One medium Red Onion, chopped
4-5 cloves of Garlic, chopped
1 Tsp Coriander seeds
White Pepper & Salt to taste
Creme Fraiche (optional)

Method
Saute the onions, garlic and coriander seeds in about 1 tbsp olive oil for about 2-3 minutes. Next add in the dudhi, potato and carrot and cook on low gas for another 10 minutes. Add in about 4-5 cups of water and cook until all vegetables are tender (about 15 minutes on low-medium gas). Add the salt and pepper. Run through the food processor or blender in batches until you have a smooth consistency. Heat again before serving (avoid boiling though not the end of the world if it boils). Add a little bit of creme fraiche and chopped coriander to each bowl if you want to make the soup a little richer.

3 comments:

Jag said...

Hey M&Ms, I just wanted to let you know that I found some Linuine! Amazingly at my local Morrisons! I was going to make a trip to Tesco today but went to Morrisons because I needed a nine-volt battery in a hurry to replace my bleeping smoke alarm and whilst I was there I found some hidden away in the pasta shelves! That made my day! Italian import too - even better!

Click here to see the oicture of it:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/route79/1016459087/

Seafood linguine tonight for me then!

Best regards - Jag @ Route 79

M&Ms... said...

Jag glad you found some and hope you enjoyed the seafood linguine!

Jag said...

Thanks for your comment, yes the seafood linguine was excellent if I may say so. It makes such a dramatic difference using this type of pasta instead of the usual spaghetti or tagliatelle or even fettucine. The Italians know how subtle differences in thickness and shape make all the difference!